news

December

6th

10 New Pics from Stephenie Meyer’s ‘The Host’

Source: Hollywood.com | Via TVC

November

28th

Stephenie Meyer’s Message to Twilighters!

Stephenie Meyer updated her website with the following message to us Twilighters:

Hi everyone. I hope you’re all coming back from a really fabulous Thanksgiving weekend, full of quality family time, too much delicious food, and restful tryptophan comas.

Two weeks ago, while doing press for Breaking Dawn 2, there were a lot of questions I wasn’t able to answer because I didn’t want to spoil the ending for anyone. I promised in a couple of interviews that I would post the answer to a specific question on my website once everyone had had a chance to see the movie. Now, if there is anyone reading this who hasn’t had a chance to see BD2 yet and really wants to remain unspoiled, please stop reading now.

***spoilers ahead***

 

The question, which I got frequently, was how I felt about having a big change inserted into the story during the final climax. My answer was that it didn’t feel like such a huge departure. For me, this moment is already in the book. However, we don’t get to see it in all its exciting and gory detail because we are seeing the world only through Bella’s eyes. A few of the reporters I talked to wanted to know where in the book this moment was hidden. The answer is page 738, fourth paragraph down:

“Aro stared into my eyes for a long, tense moment. I had no idea what he was searching for, or what he found, but after he had measured me for that moment, something in his face changed, a faint shift in the set of his mouth and eyes, and I knew that Aro had made his decision.”

In this short analysis, after Bella has revealed the depth of her power, Aro plays out in his head the probable outcome of a battle with the Cullens. Much like what we see in the movie, Aro foresees a more evenly matched fight than he had expected, the loss of too many of his key players, and—most unacceptable—the likelihood of his own death. Though odds are that the Volturi would have come out on top in the end, Aro wouldn’t have lived to see it and the unassailable nature of the Volturi’s authority would have been broken, possibly forever. It is this vision of the future—though imperfect guesswork on his part—that motivates his retreat.

Melissa Rosenberg and I have both mentioned the fateful dinner we had (back during the filming of Eclipse) where we hashed out a way to make the end of Breaking Dawn more cinematic. This was the idea we latched on to—how do we make this vision of Aro’s into something the viewer can experience? The answer was pretty simple once we looked at it that way—we already had a character who could show us visions. So the only real change to the book ending of Breaking Dawn is that Alice enters the scene earlier, and comes in contact with Aro.

(Are there a few little trespasses against the mythology in this vision? Yes, as some of you have pointed out. The consensus was that a minor deviation from what had been established was forgivable in the name of entertainment. I had a few very elaborate solutions, but they were too confusing and not nearly as cinematic as the final product. And obviously, the result was very entertaining.)

A few reporters asked me if I would have done anything different in the battle if I had written it; the answer is yes. Mainly, I would have killed more Cullens. I do think the Volturi would have won the day; as the talented players were taken out, in the end it would be brute strength that would determine the victor, and the Volturi have more soldiers and more experience. Of course, if we had offed Edward or something, it might have been too obvious that it was a vision sequence. In the end, when the vision was revealed, the reaction I heard in the two unsuspecting audiences I viewed it with was nothing but relief and enthusiasm. Kudos to Bill C for creating the perfect emotional response! He plays our heartstrings like a virtuoso.

It was really something to get to spend a little time with the fans at the BD2 events, and to watch the movie at the premiere with so many of them. It was the best experience I’ve ever had at a Twilight movie, and a perfect conclusion to my personal Twilight experience. I hope you also enjoyed the movie, and each other, for this last big bang. You, the readers and viewers, are the ones who have made this whole ten-year experience into something unbelievable and amazing, and I thank you so much for it. I hope I get to see some of you again in March (shameless The Host plug), because it makes me too sad to think that my relationship with my readers is ending, too.

Happy Holidays to you all, may the season be filled with good friends and good books!

Love,
Steph

November

10th

November

9th

Kristen Stewart & Stephenie Meyer Interview + New Pic!

Even after all this time, author Stephenie Meyer, the Mormon mother of three who became an overnight literary sensation with the 2005 publication of her young-adult novel “Twilight,” can’t explain the phenomenon that surrounds the grand romance between vampire Edward Cullen and human teenager Bella Swan, characters played on-screen by Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart.

“I don’t know what makes people love it, I don’t know what makes people hate it,” said Meyer, seated comfortably in a suite of a Beverly Hills hotel. “But I do know that the feeling of being in love is a good feeling. We want to feel that emotion.”

“I’ve always said that,” Stewart said to Meyer, sitting beside her. “It’s so vicarious. It’s not like you are watching two people or reading two people. You feel like you are doing it. It’s rare.”

 

There’s no question that “Twilight” is that rare gem: a book and movie property that stokes a kind of unquenchable fire among its largely female fan base. That following has been so sizable and so fervent that the “Twi-hards,” as they’re called, have helped transform Meyer’s supernatural tale into a $2.5-billion business, proving that girl-centric tales can be powerful forces at the box office.

With the fifth and presumably final big-screen entry, “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 2,” due to arrive in theaters Friday, Meyer and Stewart seem to share a bond reminiscent of the connection between Meyer’s two protagonists.

Their closeness stems from the unlikely duo’s joint goal of ensuring that the beloved material, for all its melodrama, remained intact as it was translated to the big screen. That required them to battle nervous studio executives who wanted Stewart’s interpretation of Bella to be less tortured, hardened detractors who railed against overwrought story lines and pop culture satirists who often turned the franchise into its own punch line.

Meyer had already made the leap from Arizona housewife to bestselling author when she first met Stewart, then an up-and-coming actress building her career primarily through roles in indie films. In the intervening years, Meyer’s stature and influence as a young-adult author became comparable to that enjoyed by J.K. Rowling or Suzanne Collins, though critics never responded to her writing the way enthusiastic readers did.
Stewart, however, has garnered plenty of acclaim — if not in the often tepidly reviewed “Twilight” movies, then in small challenging roles in films such as Sean Penn’s “Into the Wild” or Walter Salles’ upcoming adaptation of the Beat Generation classic “On the Road.” She’s also endured a tabloid celebrity she never planned for thanks to her on-again, off-again relationship with “Twilight” costar Pattinson.
Reaching the end of the saga was particularly satisfying for the actress, who seemed pleased to be able to take Bella to the happy if somewhat complicated conclusion of her journey — and to move on to the next phase of her career.
“I’m so ready to be done,” said the 22-year-old.

Directed like its predecessor by Oscar winner Bill Condon, “Breaking Dawn — Part 2″ begins with Bella Swan as a newborn vampire and a new mother, whose half-human daughter, Renesmee, threatens to spark a war among various tribes of vampires from around the globe. The ruling class in Italy, the Volturi, wrongly assume that Bella and Edward have transformed a human child into a vampire, something that is expressly forbidden, and gather forces to take down the entire Cullen clan.
The story line gave Stewart the opportunity to bring a new dimension to a character who’d always considered herself ordinary and clumsy; with her supernatural powers, she could be graceful and beautiful, lightning-fast and lethal.

A changed Bella
Directed like its predecessor by Oscar winner Bill Condon, “Breaking Dawn — Part 2″ begins with Bella Swan as a newborn vampire and a new mother, whose half-human daughter, Renesmee, threatens to spark a war among various tribes of vampires from around the globe. The ruling class in Italy, the Volturi, wrongly assume that Bella and Edward have transformed a human child into a vampire, something that is expressly forbidden, and gather forces to take down the entire Cullen clan.
The story line gave Stewart the opportunity to bring a new dimension to a character who’d always considered herself ordinary and clumsy; with her supernatural powers, she could be graceful and beautiful, lightning-fast and lethal.
“I played her as human for so long, so the enhanced version of her made so much sense to me,” said Stewart, her long limbs folded under her on the couch. “Everything so perfectly fit that I was so amped to do it.”
Meyer recalled standing in front of the monitor on the set of the film when Stewart shot her first scene as vampire Bella, nervously anticipating the outcome.
“We were dancing by the monitors — ‘Look at her go,’” Meyer said as Stewart pretended to leave the room, not wanting to hear the compliment. “It was such a huge weight lifted. It wasn’t a different character. It was Bella, but it was a totally different Bella. It was so exciting.”
Her newfound abilities also might help to dispel notions that Bella is too passive a character, a young girl too dependent on her boyfriend as a source of her happiness — though Meyer and Stewart flatly reject that view.
“Flop the roles. If Bella was a vampire and Edward was the human and you changed nothing but the genders, none of that criticism would exist,” said Stewart. “It would be ‘Wow, he just laid everything on the line for her. It’s so amazing, and it must take such strength to subject yourself to that.’ Also, the relationship is entirely equal.”
“She gets what she wants,” Meyer added.
“Plus, she’s the one that keeps the bus going the entire time,” continued Stewart. “If it was up to Edward, they would have given up at the first movie.”
The 700-page-plus “Breaking Dawn” novel was released just a few months before director Catherine Hardwicke’s adaptation of “Twilight” reached theaters in 2008. The book was met with controversy, even among Meyer’s loyal fans. Renesmee’s birth is an especially gruesome sequence — one that Condon had to carefully navigate for the previous PG-13-rated movie — and some readers complained about Bella’s choice to carry the child to term despite obvious risks to her own health.
There was also grumbling about an ending that felt too soft, too anticlimactic.
“I had a lot of concerns about making ‘Breaking Dawn’ a movie,” said Meyer, who holds final approval on the scripts for the “Twilight” films. “There were a lot of things they wanted to change. There were some serious problems.”
Fealty to source material on beloved properties like “Twilight” is always a concern — deviate too much from the book and fans, even those who maybe weren’t wild about what was on the page initially, will cry foul. But it was Meyer herself and screenwriter Melissa Rosenberg, who has written each of the five scripts for the films, who devised a new ending over dinner one night in Vancouver while the second “Twilight” movie, “New Moon,” was filming.
Of course, neither Meyer nor Stewart will reveal the new conclusion, but Meyer believes the solution is one fans will embrace. She and her star are somewhat less reserved in their elation for the digital trickery used for Renesmee, who in the book is born the size of a normal baby but whose unusual parentage results in rapid growth. (The character is played in the film by 12-year-old actress Mackenzie Foy.)
Stewart was initially asked to hold a robotic doll instead of a real baby for some scenes, but that approach didn’t yield quite the right result.
“It was the most creepy, horrific horror doll you’ve ever seen — and it was mechanical,” Meyer said with a laugh. “It’s gouging her cheek and sticking to her hair. We reshot the whole thing. We didn’t wind up using any of the footage, but that doll was so horrifying. I mean that doll comes to life and kills people.”
“They should have had a real baby,” Stewart said. “I really missed having a real baby. They were the scenes I looked forward to the most, and then I had this thing. It was really disheartening.”
Instead, the filmmakers employed some techniques David Fincher and his team pioneered for “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” projecting Foy’s face on older and younger girls as the script required.
Stewart and Meyer are ready for “Twilight” to come to a close. Its years of pop culture dominance have taken a toll on the women, particularly Stewart, who appears resigned to the glaring spotlight, though no more comfortable with it.
The two discussed the public’s desire to put celebrities on pedestals only to knock them down and the reality of the 24-hour news cycle as the mechanism that’s destroyed the mystery of the movie star.
Stewart compared the need-to-know frenzy to the public wanting another movie, one played out in magazines, on the radio and on television, based on the actors’ real lives. Things turned especially personal for Stewart last summer when photographs surfaced of the actress apparently cheating on boyfriend Pattinson with filmmaker Rupert Sanders, who directed Stewart in the fairy-tale adventure “Snow White and the Huntsman.”
“People are just going to write the movie version of your life and consume it the way they please. I get the inclination to be entertained by that as well, so go for it. Have at it. Take it. Take it,” Stewart said, pulling at her cashmere sweater. “But you knew nothing about my relationship before. You know less now. How could you?”
Meyer sympathizes with Stewart’s plight. Until the teenage stars came along, the author, a self-described introvert troubled that people felt that they knew her without ever having met her, was the one in the eye of the storm.
For Meyer, life after “Twilight” will involve more movies — Open Road will release writer-director Andrew Niccol’s adaptation of her novel “The Host” in March, and she recently produced her own indie film, “Austenland,” based on her friend Shannon Hale’s novel.
Stewart is moving on as well. She just signed on to join Ben Affleck in the lighthearted film “Focus,” in which she’ll play a woman who falls for a veteran con-man.
Meyer said new tales set in the “Twilight” universe continue to rumble in her head, but she’s not sure she’s willing to write them down and reignite the firestorm of publicity and attention.
“The stories are there. I’m just not sure I’d want to get into the hurricane again,” Meyer said. “Maybe on my death bed I’ll gather everybody around and tell them what happens: who dies, who turns into a bad guy. And then I’ll breathe my last breath and be done.”
“What a perfect way to end it,” Stewart added.

source via @kstewfan10 | via

September

7th

Stephenie Meyer Talks Kristen Stewart & Writing!

Stephenie Meyer chatted briefly with E! News Friday in New York at Project Runway‘s finale show during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week.

When asked about the Kristen Stewart cheating scandal she commented, “That is so not my business.”

Stephenie went on to chat about the Twilight series movies coming to an end:

“I tend to get really sad when I have to [think about the final film],” she said. “So I’m sort of putting it off. I figure it’ll be a really emotional night when it comes out and we know that it’s over. That’s going to be rough.”

Stephenie also added, “I’m writing now.”

Well Stephenie, we can’t wait to see what you’re writing!

July

26th

June

14th

THE HOST: First Look at Jake Abel!

Hello ‘The Host’ Fans! Catch a first look at Jake Abel in The Host (below) and see what he has to say about working with famed author of THE TWILIGHT SAGA Stephenie Meyer, his co-stars, and more! Also see a brand new photo of Saoirse Ronan and Jake Abel from THE HOST!

Check out Entertainment Weekly’s first look at THE HOST featuring Jake Abel HERE

THE HOST, which arrives in theaters everywhere March 29, 2013, is a riveting story about the survival of love and the human spirit in a time of war. Our world has been invaded by an unseen enemy. Humans become hosts for these invaders, their minds taken over while their bodies remain intact. Most of humanity has succumbed. 

THE HOST stars SAOIRSE RONAN (Hanna, The Lovely Bones, Atonement, upcoming Byzantium), JAKE ABEL (Percy Jackson And The Olympians: The Lightening Thief, I Am Number Four, The Lovely Bones, upcoming Percy Jackson And The Olympians: Sea of Monsters), MAX IRONS (Red Riding Hood, Dorian Gray, upcoming Vivaldi), WILLIAM HURT (Into The Wild, A History Of Violence, The Incredible Hulk) and DIANE KRUGER (Inglourious Basterds, National Treasure, Unknown).

April

14th

E! : 5 Things You Want to Know About Stephenie Meyer’s ‘The Host’

Check out E!’s list of 5 things to know about Stephenie Meyer’s ‘The Host’ below:

1. The Leading Lass Has Mega-Talent: Haven’t heard of Saoirse Ronan? Well, cement that Irish name in your brain, because Ronan is an acting force to be reckoned with. She appeared alongside Keira Knightley in Atonement and was nominated for an Academy Award for her role at the young age of 13. Saoirse also starred in The Lovely Bones and most recently the action flick HannaQuitean impressive résumé, no? Kristen Stewart, you’ve certainly got some competition.

2. Get Ready for Lots of Sci-Fi Action: If the teaser trailer is any indication, we’re gearing up for a supernatural sensation. And while the preview keeps things mysterious, we do know the movie follows Mel (Ronan), whose body becomes inhabited by the Wanderer alien and she must fight for control of her mind. “It is no longer your world,” Ronan whispers in the trailer as we watch a quick flash of alien-inhabited humans. Intrigued yet? We’re certainly excited to see more.

 

Read the rest HERE

 

Via TeamTwilight

 

April

11th

March

21st

THE HOST | First Trailer Debuting This Week!

Hey everyone! I just got this info in regarding The Host trailer! As most of you know, ‘The Host’ is a book written by Stephenie Meyer which was turned into a movie.


Tune in to Access Hollywood and Yahoo! Movies this Thursday, March 22, for a look at the first trailer for THE HOST, the highly anticipated film based on the best-selling novel by TWILIGHT SAGA author Stephenie Meyer.  The trailer features six lucky winners of The Host Trailer Contest held on Facebook last month so be sure to check it out.

THE HOST is a riveting story about the survival of love and the human spirit in a time of war.  Our world has been invaded by an unseen enemy. Humans become hosts for these invaders, their minds taken over while their bodies remain intact.  Most of humanity has succumbed.

Directed by Andrew Niccol (GATTACA, IN TIME), THE HOST stars Saoirse Ronan (HANNA, THE LOVELY BONES, ATONEMENT), Max Irons (RED RIDING HOOD), Jake Abel (I AM NUMBER FOUR, PERCY JACKSON & THE OLYMPIANS), Diane Kruger (INGLORIOUS BASTARDS, UNKNOWN), William Hurt (INTO THE WILD, THE INCREDIBLE HULK) and Frances Fisher (TITANIC).  THE HOST will be in theaters everywhere March 29, 2013.

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